leptos-mview

Crates.ioleptos-mview
lib.rsleptos-mview
version0.3.1
sourcesrc
created_at2023-09-30 03:41:28.959574
updated_at2024-03-31 23:36:50.838128
descriptionA concise view macro for Leptos
homepage
repositoryhttps://github.com/blorbb/leptos-mview
max_upload_size
id988366
size98,907
(blorbb)

documentation

README

Leptos mview

crates.io

An alternative view! macro for Leptos inspired by maud.

Example

A little preview of the syntax:

use leptos::*;
use leptos_mview::mview;

#[component]
fn MyComponent() -> impl IntoView {
    let (value, set_value) = create_signal(String::new());
    let red_input = move || value().len() % 2 == 0;

    mview! {
        h1.title { "A great website" }
        br;

        input
            type="text"
            data-index=0
            class:red={red_input}
            prop:{value}
            on:change={move |ev| {
                set_value(event_target_value(&ev))
            }};

        Show
            when=[!value().is_empty()]
            fallback=[mview! { "..." }]
        {
            Await
                future=[fetch_from_db(value())]
                blocking
            |db_info| {
                p { "Things found: " strong { {*db_info} } "!" }
                p { "Is bad: " f["{}", red_input()] }
            }
        }
    }
}

async fn fetch_from_db(data: String) -> usize { data.len() }
Explanation of the example:
use leptos::*;
use leptos_mview::mview;

#[component]
fn MyComponent() -> impl IntoView {
    let (value, set_value) = create_signal(String::new());
    let red_input = move || value().len() % 2 == 0;

    mview! {
        // specify tags and attributes, children go in braces
        // classes (and ids) can be added like CSS selectors.
        // same as `h1 class="title"`
        h1.title { "A great website" }
        // elements with no children end with a semi-colon
        br;

        input
            type="text"
            data-index=0 // kebab-cased identifiers supported
            class:red={red_input} // non-literal values must be wrapped in braces
            prop:{value} // shorthand! same as `prop:value={value}`
            on:change={move |ev| { // event handlers same as leptos
                set_value(event_target_value(&ev))
            }};

        Show
            // values wrapped in brackets `[body]` are expanded to `{move || body}`
            when=[!value().is_empty()] // `{move || !value().is_empty()}`
            fallback=[mview! { "..." }] // `{move || mview! { "..." }}`
        { // I recommend placing children like this when attributes are multi-line
            Await
                future=[fetch_from_db(value())]
                blocking // expanded to `blocking=true`
            // children take arguments with a 'closure'
            // this is very different to `let:db_info` in Leptos!
            |db_info| {
                p { "Things found: " strong { {*db_info} } "!" }
                // bracketed expansion works in children too!
                // this one also has a special prefix to add `format!` into the expansion!
                //    {move || format!("{}", red_input()}
                p { "Is bad: " f["{}", red_input()] }
            }
        }
    }
}

// fake async function
async fn fetch_from_db(data: String) -> usize { data.len() }

Purpose

The view! macros in Leptos is often the largest part of a component, and can get extremely long when writing complex components. This macro aims to be as concise as possible, trying to minimise unnecessary punctuation/words and shorten common patterns.

Performance note

Currently, the macro expands to the builder syntax (ish), but it has some performance downsides in SSR mode. This is expected to be fixed with the new renderer in Leptos 0.7, so I'm not going to make this implementation.

Compatibility

This macro will be compatible with the latest stable release of Leptos. The macro references Leptos items using ::leptos::..., no items are re-exported from this crate. Therefore, this crate will likely work with any Leptos version if no view-related items are changed.

The below are the versions with which I have tested it to be working. It is likely that the macro works with more versions of Leptos.

leptos_mview version Compatible leptos version
0.1 0.5
0.2 0.5, 0.6
0.3 0.6

Syntax details

Elements

Elements have the following structure:

  1. Element / component tag name / path (div, App, component::Codeblock).
  2. Any classes or ids prefixed with a dot . or hash # respectively.
  3. A space-separated list of attributes and directives (class="primary", on:click={...}).
  4. Either children in braces/parens ({ "hi!" } or ("hi")) or a semi-colon for no children (;).

Example:

mview! {
    div.primary { strong { "hello world" } }
    input type="text" on:input={handle_input};
    MyComponent data=3 other="hi";
}

Adding generics is the same as in Leptos: add it directly after the component name, with or without the turbofish.

#[component]
pub fn GenericComponent<S>(ty: PhantomData<S>) -> impl IntoView {
    std::any::type_name::<S>()
}

#[component]
pub fn App() -> impl IntoView {
    mview! {
        // both with and without turbofish is supported
        GenericComponent::<String> ty={PhantomData};
        GenericComponent<usize> ty={PhantomData};
        GenericComponent<i32> ty={PhantomData};
    }
}

Note that due to Reserving syntax, the # for ids must have a space before it.

mview! {
    nav #primary { "..." }
    // not allowed: nav#primary { "..." }
}

Classes/ids created with the selector syntax can be mixed with the attribute class="..." and directive class:a-class={signal} as well.

Slots

Slots (another example) are supported by prefixing the struct with slot: inside the parent's children.

The name of the parameter in the component function must be the same as the slot's name, in snake case.

Using the slots defined by the SlotIf example linked:

use leptos::*;
use leptos_mview::mview;

#[component]
pub fn App() -> impl IntoView {
    let (count, set_count) = RwSignal::new(0).split();
    let is_even = MaybeSignal::derive(move || count() % 2 == 0);
    let is_div5 = MaybeSignal::derive(move || count() % 5 == 0);
    let is_div7 = MaybeSignal::derive(move || count() % 7 == 0);

    mview! {
        SlotIf cond={is_even} {
            slot:Then { "even" }
            slot:ElseIf cond={is_div5} { "divisible by 5" }
            slot:ElseIf cond={is_div7} { "divisible by 7" }
            slot:Fallback { "odd" }
        }
    }
}

Values

There are (currently) 3 main types of values you can pass in:

  • Literals can be passed in directly to attribute values (like data=3, class="main", checked=true).

    • However, children do not accept literal numbers or bools - only strings.
      mview! { p { "this works " 0 " times: " true } }
      
  • Everything else must be passed in as a block, including variables, closures, or expressions.

    mview! {
        input
            class="main"
            checked=true
            madeup=3
            type={input_type}
            on:input={move |_| handle_input(1)};
    }
    

    This is not valid:

    let input_type = "text";
    // ❌ This is not valid! Wrap input_type in braces.
    mview! { input type=input_type }
    
  • Values wrapped in brackets (like value=[a_bool().to_string()]) are shortcuts for a block with an empty closure move || ... (to value={move || a_bool().to_string()}).

    mview! {
        Show
            fallback=[()] // common for not wanting a fallback as `|| ()`
            when=[number() % 2 == 0] // `{move || number() % 2 == 0}`
        {
            "number + 1 = " [number() + 1] // works in children too!
        }
    }
    
    • Note that this always expands to move || ...: for any closures that take an argument, use the full closure block instead.

      mview! {
          input type="text" on:click=[log!("THIS DOESNT WORK")];
      }
      

      Instead:

      mview! {
          input type="text" on:click={|_| log!("THIS WORKS!")};
      }
      

The bracketed values can also have some special prefixes for even more common shortcuts!

  • Currently, the only one is f - e.g. f["{:.2}", stuff()]. Adding an f will add format! into the closure. This is equivalent to [format!("{:.2}", stuff())] or {move || format!("{:.2}", stuff())}.

Attributes

Key-value attributes

Most attributes are key=value pairs. The value follows the rules from above. The key has a few variations:

  • Standard identifier: identifiers like type, an_attribute, class, id etc are valid keys.

  • Kebab-case identifier: identifiers can be kebab-cased, like data-value, an-attribute.

    • NOTE: on HTML elements, this will be put on the element as is: div data-index="0"; becomes <div data-index="0"></div>. On components, hyphens are converted to underscores then passed into the component builder.

      For example, this component:

      #[component]
      fn Something(some_attribute: i32) -> impl IntoView { ... }
      

      Can be used elsewhere like this:

      mview! { Something some-attribute=5; }
      

      And the some-attribute will be passed in to the some_attribute argument.

  • Attribute shorthand: if the name of the attribute and value are the same, e.g. class={class}, you can replace this with {class} to mean the same thing.

    let class = "these are classes";
    let id = "primary";
    mview! {
        div {class} {id} { "this has 3 classes and id='primary'" }
    }
    

    See also: kebab-case identifiers with attribute shorthand

Note that the special node_ref or ref or _ref or ref_ attribute in Leptos to bind the element to a variable is just ref={variable} in here.

Boolean attributes

Another shortcut is that boolean attributes can be written without adding =true. Watch out though! checked is very different to {checked}.

// recommend usually adding #[prop(optional)] to all these
#[component]
fn LotsOfFlags(wide: bool, tall: bool, red: bool, curvy: bool, count: i32) -> impl IntoView {}

mview! { LotsOfFlags wide tall red=false curvy count=3; }
// same as...
mview! { LotsOfFlags wide=true tall=true red=false curvy=true count=3; }

See also: boolean attributes on HTML elements

Directives

Some special attributes (distinguished by the :) called directives have special functionality. All have the same behaviour as Leptos. These include:

  • class:class-name=[when to show]
  • style:style-key=[style value]
  • on:event={move |ev| event handler}
  • prop:property-name={signal}
  • attr:name={value}
  • clone:ident_to_clone
  • use:directive_name or use:directive_name={params}

All of these directives except clone also support the attribute shorthand:

let color = create_rw_signal("red".to_string());
let disabled = false;
mview! {
    div style:{color} class:{disabled};
}

The class and style directives also support using string literals, for more complicated names. Make sure the string for class: doesn't have spaces, or it will panic!

let yes = move || true;
mview! {
    div class:"complex-[class]-name"={yes}
        style:"doesn't-exist"="white";
}

Note that the use: directive automatically calls .into() on its argument, consistent with behaviour from Leptos.

Special Attributes

There are a few special attributes you can put on your component to emulate some features only available on HTML elements.

If a component has a class attribute, the classes using the selector syntax .some-class and dynamic classes class:thing={signal} can be passed in!

#[component]
// the `class` parameter should have these attributes and type to work properly
fn TakesClasses(#[prop(optional, into)] class: TextProp) -> impl IntoView {
    mview! {
        // "my-component" will always be present, extra classes passed in will also be added
        div.my-component class=[class.get()] { "..." }
    }
}

// <div class="my-component extra-class">
mview! {
    TakesClasses.extra-class;
};

It is suggested to only pass in static classes (i.e. with selectors or just a plain class="..."), as using dynamic classes needs to construct a new string every time any of the signals change; dynamic classes are supported if you want them though.

let signal = RwSignal::new(true);
// <div class="my-component always-has-this special">
mview! {
    TakesClasses.always-has-this class:special={signal};
}
signal.set(false);
// becomes <div class="my-component always-has-this">

There is one small difference from the class: syntax on HTML elements: the value passed in must be an Fn() -> bool, it cannot just be a bool.

This is also supported with an id attribute to forward #my-id, though not reactively.

#[component]
// the `id` parameter should have these attributes and type to work properly
fn TakesIds(#[prop(optional)] id: &'static str) -> impl IntoView {
    mview! {
        div {id} { "..." }
    }
}

// <div id="my-unique-id">
mview! {
    TakesIds #my-unique-id;
};

This is also supported on slots by having a class and id field with the same attributes and types as the components above.

Children

You may have noticed that the let:data prop was missing from the previous section on directive attributes!

This is replaced with a closure right before the children block. This way, you can pass in multiple arguments to the children more easily.

mview! {
    Await
        future=[async { 3 }]
    |monkeys| {
        p { {*monkeys} " little monkeys, jumping on the bed." }
    }
}

Note that you will usually need to add a * before the data you are using. If you forget that, rust-analyser will tell you to dereference here: *{monkeys}. This is obviously invalid - put it inside the braces. (If anyone knows how to fix this, feel free to contribute!)

Children can be wrapped in either braces or parentheses, whichever you prefer.

mview! {
    p {
        "my " strong("bold") " and " em("fancy") " text."
    }
}

Summary from the previous section on values in case you missed it: children can be literal strings (not bools or numbers!), blocks with Rust code inside ({*monkeys}), or the closure shorthand [number() + 1].

Children with closures are also supported on slots, add a field children: Callback<T, View> to use it (T is whatever type you want).

Extra details

Kebab-case identifiers with attribute shorthand

If an attribute shorthand has hyphens:

  • On components, both the key and value will be converted to underscores.

    let some_attribute = 5;
    mview! { Something {some-attribute}; }
    // same as...
    mview! { Something {some_attribute}; }
    // same as...
    mview! { Something some_attribute={some_attribute}; }
    
  • On HTML elements, the key will keep hyphens, but the value will be turned into an identifier with underscores.

    let aria_label = "a good label";
    mview! { input {aria-label}; }
    // same as...
    mview! { input aria-label={aria_label}; }
    

Boolean attributes on HTML elements

Note the behaviour from Leptos: setting an HTML attribute to true adds the attribute with no value associated.

use leptos::view;
view! { <input type="checkbox" checked=true data-smth=true not-here=false /> }

Becomes <input type="checkbox" checked data-smth />, NOT checked="true" or data-smth="true" or not-here="false".

To have the attribute have a value of the string "true" or "false", use .to_string() on the bool. Make sure that it's in a closure if you're working with signals too.

let boolean_signal = RwSignal::new(true);
mview! { input type="checkbox" checked=[boolean_signal().to_string()]; }
// or, if you prefer
mview! { input type="checkbox" checked=f["{}", boolean_signal()]; }

Contributing

Please feel free to make a PR/issue if you have feature ideas/bugs to report/feedback :)

Commit count: 188

cargo fmt